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Surah 1. Al-Fathiha, Ayah 1



بِسْمِ اللَّهِ الرَّحْمَٰنِ الرَّحِيمِ


Asad : IN THE NAME OF GOD, THE MOST GRACIOUS, THE DISPENSER OF GRACE:1
Malik : In the name of Allah, the Compassionate, the Merciful.
Pickthall : In the name of Allah, the Beneficent, the Merciful
Yusuf Ali : In the name of Allah Most Gracious Most Merciful. 19
Transliteration : Bismi Allahi alrrahmani alrraheemi
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  Rahoof  
  4 years 1 week ago
The desciption of Allah in the translations by Asad and Yusuf Ali are not appropriate. If anything, blasphemous. Defining Allah in superlative adjective suggests that Allah is being compared with something or somebody. Hear them: Asad: In the name of Allah, the MOST GRACIOUS ..... Yusuf Ali: In the name of Allah, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful. The most acurate and more appropriate description of Allah is embedded in the translations given by the dou, Malik and Pickthall respectively as: In the name of Allah, the Compassionate, the Merciful and "......the Beneficient, the Merciful..." It is patently a blasphemy comparing Allah with any of His creatures. I suggest the blasphemous adjective should be removed in the new editions. Abdul-Rahoof Ibn Bello.
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  Shahid Shah   in reply to  
  4 years 5 days ago
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  Syed Husain   in reply to  
  4 years 17 hours ago
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  salim anik   in reply to Syed Husain 
  3 years 50 weeks ago
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  Abdul Fawzi   in reply to  
  2 years 5 weeks ago
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image   Abolarin Musodiq    
  3 years 6 weeks ago


Al-hamdulillahi-Rabbil-alamin, for this wonderful comments for it is a mercy from Allah(SWT) that we muslims se things from a different perspective as long as it does not invalidate our being a muslim...

Concerning the issue of translation of  Ar-Rahman-ni-Rahim-  i would support the view of Syed Hussain as it more convincing.   

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  Tauheedah  
  2 years 28 weeks ago


Ma salaam.

I enjoyed reading Salim Anik's response to Syed Husain's criticism of Yusuf Ali's translation of Ar-Rahman and Ar-Rahim.  Brother Salim's response was comprehensive and without malice.  Islam is a beautiful and peaceful deen. 

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  gulgul  
  2 years 19 weeks ago
Assalamoalaikum this is a very good software.could anyone tell me if its available on a CD.if yes where can I get it from in UK. Jazakumullahu khairan
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  Ferasat Hussain   in reply to  
  2 years 13 weeks ago
Asad   
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Asad 1 According to most of the authorities, this invocation (which occurs at the beginning of every surah with the exception of surah 9) constitutes an integral part of "The Opening" and is, therefore, numbered as verse {1}. In all other instances, the invocation "in the name of God" precedes the surah as such, and is not counted among its verses. - Both the divine epithets rahman and rahim are derived from the noun rahmah, which signifies "mercy", "compassion", "loving tenderness" and, more comprehensively, "grace". From the very earliest times, Islamic scholars have endeavoured to define the exact shades of meaning which differentiate the two terms. The best and simplest of these explanations is undoubtedly the one advanced by Ibn al-Qayyim (as quoted in Manar I,48): the term rahman circumscribes the quality of abounding grace inherent in, and inseparable from, the concept of God's Being, whereas rahim expresses the manifestation of that grace in, and its effect upon, His creation - in other words, an aspect of His activity.

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Yusuf Ali   
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Yusuf Ali 19 The Arabic words "Rahman" and "Rahim" translated "Most Gracious" and "Most Merciful" are both intensive forms referring to different aspects of God's attribute of Mercy. The Arabic intensive is more suited to express God's attributes than the superlative degree in English. The latter implies a comparison with other beings, or with other times or places, while there is no being like unto God, and He is independent of Time and Place. Mercy may imply pity, long-suffering, patience, and forgiveness, all of which the sinner needs and God Most Merciful bestows in abundant measure. But there is a Mercy that goes before even the need arises, the Grace which is ever watchful, and flows from God Most Gracious to all His creatures, protecting the, preserving them, guiding them, and leading them to clearer light and higher life. For this reason the attribute Rahman (Most Gracious) is not applied to any but God, but the attribute Rahim (Merciful), is a general term, and may also be applied to Men. To make us contemplate these boundless gifts of God, the formula: "In the name of God Most Gracious, Most Merciful": is placed before every Sura of the Qur-an (except the ninth), and repeated at the beginning of every act by the Muslim who dedicates his life to God, and whose hope is in His Mercy.
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