Al-Quran Surah 10. Yunus, Ayah 92

Al-Quran Grammar      Prev      Go   Next  
فَالْيَوْمَ نُنَجِّيكَ بِبَدَنِكَ لِتَكُونَ لِمَنْ خَلْفَكَ آيَةً ۚ وَإِنَّ كَثِيرًا مِنَ النَّاسِ عَنْ آيَاتِنَا لَغَافِلُونَ


Asad : [Nay,] but today We shall save only thy body,112 so that thou mayest be a [warning] sign unto those who will come after thee: for, behold, a good many people are heedless of Our messages!"
Khattab :

Today We will preserve your corpse so that you may become an example1 for those who come after you. And surely most people are heedless of Our examples!”

Malik : We shall save your body this day, so that you may become a sign for the succeeding generations, indeed many among mankind are heedless of Our signs!"
Pickthall : But this day We save thee in thy body that thou mayest be a portent for those after thee. Lo! most of mankind are heedless of Our portents.
Yusuf Ali : "This day shall We save thee in thy body that thou mayest be a Sign to those who come after thee! But verily many among mankind are heedless of Our Signs!"
Transliteration : Faalyawma nunajjeeka bibadanika litakoona liman khalfaka ayatan wainna katheeran mina alnnasi AAan ayatina laghafiloona
PDF content
Tags 


Share your thoughts about this with others by posting a comment. Visit our FAQ for some ideas.

Comment Filters >>
Filter Comments  

search-icon
User Roles  
Groups  
NO ADVERTISEMENT OR PROMOTION, PLEASE.
Asad   
0 votes 0  dislikes 
Asad 112 Lit., "We shall save thee in thy body": probably an allusion to the ancient Egyptian custom of embalming the bodies of their kings and nobles and thus preserving them for posterity. Some Egyptologists assume that the "evil Pharaoh" of the Qur'an and the Bible was Ramses II (about 1324-1258 B.C.), while others identify him with his unlucky predecessor, Tut-ankh-amen, or even with Thotmes (or Thutmosis) III, who lived in the 15th century B.C. However, all these "identifications" are purely speculative and have no definitive historical value. In this connection it should be remembered that the designation "Pharaoh" (fir'awn in Arabic) is not a proper name but a title borne by all the kings of ancient Egypt.

No Comments Found

No Comments Found

No Comments Found

   
0 votes 0  dislikes 
29213

 lit., sign.

Subscribe