Al-Quran Surah 13. Ar-Ra'd, Ayah 35

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۞ مَثَلُ الْجَنَّةِ الَّتِي وُعِدَ الْمُتَّقُونَ ۖ تَجْرِي مِنْ تَحْتِهَا الْأَنْهَارُ ۖ أُكُلُهَا دَائِمٌ وَظِلُّهَا ۚ تِلْكَ عُقْبَى الَّذِينَ اتَّقَوْا ۖ وَعُقْبَى الْكَافِرِينَ النَّارُ


Asad : THE PARABLE of the paradise promised to those who are conscious of God [is that of a garden] through which running waters flow:65 [but, unlike an earthly garden,] its fruits will be everlasting, and [so will be] its shade.66 Such will be the destiny of those who remain conscious of God - just as the destiny of those who deny the truth will be the fire.67
Khattab :

The description of the Paradise promised to the righteous is that under it rivers flow; eternal is its fruit as well as its shade. That is the ˹ultimate˺ outcome for the righteous. But the outcome for the disbelievers is the Fire!

Malik : As for the paradise which the righteous have been promised, it is like this: rivers flow beneath it; eternal are its fruits, and eternal are its shades; such is the reward of the righteous. But the reward of unbelievers is the fire.
Pickthall : A similitude of the Garden which is promised unto those who keep their duty (to Allah): Underneath it rivers flow; its food is everlasting, and its shade; this is the reward of those who keep their duty, while the reward of disbelievers is the Fire.
Yusuf Ali : The parable of the Garden which the righteous are promised! beneath it flow rivers: perpetual is the enjoyment thereof and the shade therein: such is the End of the Righteous; and the End of Unbelievers is the Fire. 1854 1855 1856
Transliteration : Mathalu aljannati allatee wuAAida almuttaqoona tajree min tahtiha alanharu okuluha daimun wathilluha tilka AAuqba allatheena ittaqaw waAAuqba alkafireena alnnaru
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Asad   
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Asad 65 This rendering (and the interpolation of the words "is that of a garden") reproduces literally the interpretation given to the above passage by Az-Zajjaj, as quoted by Zamakhshari and - in an abbreviated form - by Razi; according to Zamakhshari, this passage serves "as a parabolic illustration, by means of something which we know from our experience, of something that is beyond the reach of our perception" (tamthilan li-ma ghaba 'anna bi-ma nushahid). As in the similar (but wider) reference to "the parable of paradise" in 47:15, we are here reminded that the Qur'anic descriptions of what awaits man after resurrection are, of necessity, metaphorical, since the human mind cannot conceive of anything that is - both in its elements and its totality - entirely different from anything that can be experienced in this world. (See in this connection Appendix I.)
Asad   
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Asad 66 I.e., its gift of happiness. Regarding this metaphorical meaning of zill ("shade"). see the last clause of 4:57 and the corresponding note [74].
Asad   
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Asad 67 For my rendering of 'uqba, in this context, as "destiny" see note [45] above.

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Yusuf Ali   
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Yusuf Ali 1854 For the comprehensive meaning of the root akala (literally "to eat"), see v. 66, n. 776. In its derived meaning it means fruit and enjoyment of all kinds, spiritual as well as other. The joys of heaven are not like the joys of the earth, which fade away or cloy. The joys of heaven are pure, lasting, and without any of the drawbacks which we associate with the joys of the sense.
Yusuf Ali   
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Yusuf Ali 1855 Zillun: literally shade, hence, shelter, protection, security. All these meanings are implied. Shade is one of the delights of a garden. Cf. iv. 57 and n. 579.
Yusuf Ali   
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Yusuf Ali 1856 In this, as in other places, the Fire is contrasted with the Garden, as Misery is contrasted with Bliss. We can also imagine other incidents in contrast with those of the Garden, e.g., with the Fire will be drought, aridity, thirst, instead of beautiful rivers; pain and suffering, instead of perpetual delight; no protection against the fierceness of the heat, as contrasted with the cool shades ever deepening as you proceed in the Garden.

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