Al-Quran Surah 17. Al-Israa, Ayah 39

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ذَٰلِكَ مِمَّا أَوْحَىٰ إِلَيْكَ رَبُّكَ مِنَ الْحِكْمَةِ ۗ وَلَا تَجْعَلْ مَعَ اللَّهِ إِلَٰهًا آخَرَ فَتُلْقَىٰ فِي جَهَنَّمَ مَلُومًا مَدْحُورًا


Asad : this is part of that knowledge of right and wrong with which thy Sustainer has inspired thee.47 Hence, do not set up any other deity side by side with God,48 lest thou be cast into hell, blamed [by thyself] and rejected [by Him]!
Khattab :

This is part of the wisdom which your Lord has revealed to you ˹O Prophet˺. And do not set up any other god with Allah ˹O humanity˺, or you will be cast into Hell, blameworthy, rejected.

Malik : This is but a part of the wisdom which your Rabb has revealed to you. Do not associate other deities as object of worship, lest you should be cast into hell, blameworthy rejected.
Pickthall : This is (part) of that wisdom wherewith thy Lord hath inspired thee (O Muhammad). And set not up with Allah any other god, lest thou be cast into hell, reproved, abandoned.
Yusuf Ali : These are among the (precepts of) wisdom which thy Lord Has revealed to thee. Take not with Allah another object of worship lest thou shouldst be thrown into Hell blameworthy and rejected. 2224 2225
Transliteration : Thalika mimma awha ilayka rabbuka mina alhikmati wala tajAAal maAAa Allahi ilahan akhara fatulqa fee jahannama malooman madhooran
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Asad   
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Asad 47 Or: "which thy Sustainer has revealed to thee". It is to be noted that the noun ,hikmah, usually signifying "wisdom", is derived from the verb ,hakama ("he prevented" or "restrained [him or it]", i.e., from acting in an undesirable manner). Hence, the primary meaning of hikmah is "that which prevents one from evil or ignorant behaviour" (cf. Lane II, 617); in its positive sense, it signifies "[conscious] insight into that which is most excellent" (Lisan al-'Arab, Taj al-'Arus). Inasmuch as this term refers here, in particular, to what is "odious in God's sight", it implies moral discrimination (or "the knowledge of right and wrong") on the part of men; and this, in its turn, presupposes the existence of an absolute, God-willed standard of moral values.
Asad   
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Asad 48 Since there is no basis for an acceptance of absolute moral values-i.e., values that are independent of time and social circumstances - without a belief in God and His ultimate judgment, the passage ends, as it began, with a call to a cognition of God's oneness and uniqueness.

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Yusuf Ali   
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Yusuf Ali 2224 The moral law, as expounded in xvii. 23-39 is far in advance of the bare Decalogue in that it searches out motives, and draws pointed attention to the weak and helpless if we are to reach any real understanding of Allah. It begins with a mention of the worship of Allah, the One True God and ends with a similar mention to close the argument, thus emphasizing the fact that the love of Allah embraces the love of man and practical help of our fellow-creatures.
Yusuf Ali   
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Yusuf Ali 2225 "Blameworthy" carries us back by reminiscence to xvii. 29, between which and this verse there is mention of crimes committed out of covetousness and a selfish disregard of other people's rights. "Rejected" carries back our reminiscence to xvii. 18, from which to here we have a reference to crimes that lead to deprivation of Allah's grace. The latter is of course wider than the former. Note how subtly the two streams of thought are here conjoined.

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