Al-Quran Surah 6. Al-An'am, Ayah 74

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۞ وَإِذْ قَالَ إِبْرَاهِيمُ لِأَبِيهِ آزَرَ أَتَتَّخِذُ أَصْنَامًا آلِهَةً ۖ إِنِّي أَرَاكَ وَقَوْمَكَ فِي ضَلَالٍ مُبِينٍ


Asad : AND, LO, [thus] spoke Abraham unto his father Azar:66 "Takest thou idols for gods? Verily, I see that thou and thy people have obviously gone astray!"
Khattab :

And ˹remember˺ when Abraham said to his father, Ȃzar, “Do you take idols as gods? It is clear to me that you and your people are entirely misguided.”

Malik : Tell them about Ibrahim (Abraham), who said to Azer, his father: "Are you taking idols for gods? Surely, I see you and your people in manifest error."
Pickthall : (Remember) when Abraham said unto his father Azar: Takest thou idols for gods? Lo! I see thee and thy folk in error manifest.
Yusuf Ali : Lo! Abraham said to his father Azar: "Takest thou idols for gods? for I see thee and thy people in manifest error."
Transliteration : Waith qala ibraheemu liabeehi azara atattakhithu asnaman alihatan innee araka waqawmaka fee dalalin mubeenin
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Asad 66 The subsequent passage verses {74} ff. continues, by way of narrative, the exposition of God's oneness and uniqueness. - In the Bible, the name of Abraham's father is given not as Azar but as Terah (the Tarah or Tarakh of the early Muslim genealogists). However, he seems to have been known by other names (or designations) as well, all of them obscure as to origin and meaning. Thus, in various Talmudic stories he is called Zarah, while Eusebius Pamphili (the ecclesiastical historian who lived towards the end of the third and the beginning of the fourth century of the Christian era) gives his name as Athar. Although neither the Talmud nor Eusebius can be regarded as authorities for the purposes of a Qur'an-commentary, it is not impossible that the designation Azar (which occurs in the Qur'an only once) is the pre-Islamic, Arabicized form of Athar or Zarah.

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